Uses

Temperature Sensor Uses, Measurements or Applications

MEASUREMENTS ARE WHERE TEMPERATURE SENSORS MEET THE “REAL WORLD”! WHERE THE RESULTS PROVE THAT ONE UNDERSTANDS THEIR PROPERTIES AND HAS SELECTED A SENSOR WELL ENOUGH TO DO THE JOB WITHIN THE DESIRED MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY!

Many people have trod these paths before you and there is a wealth of information on successful use of temperature sensors under a great many different conditions and contexts.

Cataloging proven uses of temperature sensors or temperature measurements (called applications by most vendors) can help in two ways.

First, it saves one from “reinventing the wheel” all over again.

Second, it can make a new measurement problem easier to solve if it is analogous to a proven one, with perhaps only a change to one or two of the influencing conditions.

This section of the site is where the real fun begins for anyone trying to make a serious temperature or dewpoint measurement. Our object is to catalog web sources of information of such measurement successes.

The use of a structured approach to measurements helps even more but will have to wait until a little later. There are courses which teach such things, for instance, ISA Training, and others, but not for free.

The Temperature & Moisture Sensor Directories website, www.TempSensor.net has a feature enabling all interested individuals to enter reviews of products and services as well as successes in measurements.

We have been gathering this information over time and provide it, with appropriate acknowledgments, for all to access freely, in the spirit of Internet sharing.

In addition to links to applications and technology references, the directories website also has a self-service facility for manufacturers to add their own corporate listing as well as details of new product and personnel news.

User inputs are reviewed for appropriateness and over zealousness.

Index to Temperature Sensor Measurements

  1. CRYOGENICS AND CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURE SENSORS USES
  2. DEWPOINT TEMPERATURE & HUMIDITY IN GASES
  3. ENVIRONMENT TEMPERATURES & WEATHER
    Environment Temperature is another significant application of temperature sensors. The page also features links on Weather.
  4. Food Temperatures, Food Temperature Sensors and Food Safety
    A page inspired by the extensive use of a wide range of different types of temperature sensors in the measurement of food temperature in many aspects of cooking, not the least of which is in assuring that various food types are cooked sufficiently to kill any dangerous organisms that may be in them.
  5. HVACThe use of temperature and humidity sensors and other measurement devices to control the environment in which people live and work and in which, too, some products are processed. This is a widespread activity involving huge companies as well as small ones in providing equipment, training, design and services to many individual and corporate customers.

    There are many portal sites on the Web leading to more details, but our page attempts an overview of this important use of temperature and humidity sensors.

  6. STEEL INDUSTRY TEMPERATURE SENSOR MEASUREMENTS
  7. SLAG DETECTION BY IR THERMOGRAPHY
    A unique application pioneered in the Steel Industries of the world. Includes access to two full-text technical papers and a PPT slide presentation.
  8. INFRARED RADIATION THERMOMETER MEASUREMENTS AND USES
    A reasonably mature area of this site with links to vendor pages that provide applications information, some in great depth. It is planned to expand this section greatly in the near future with actual full-text papers, like some of the steel mill applications (above), since the primary author of the site has much experience in the field.
  9. MEDICAL USES OF TEMPERATURE SENSORS
  10. THERMOCOUPLE MEASUREMENTS
  11. THERMOGRAPHY APPLICATIONS
    Recently enhanced with major page revisions, three new related pages and an expanded vendors page.
  12. RTD MEASUREMENTS (Under Construction)
  13. THERMISTOR MEASUREMENTS (Under Construction)
  14. LIQUID IN GLASS THERMOMETER MEASUREMENTS (Under Construction)
  15. FIBEROPTIC THERMOMETER USES (Under Construction)
  16. OTHER TEMPERATURE SENSOR APPLICATIONS (Under Construction)
  17. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS: REFERENCE BOOKS AND PAPERS
    This link takes you to our reference list of books and published works that contain among them a wealth of information on how temperature sensors are used, the recommended limits of use for each type and much more.As stated elsewhere in this web site (or at least implied), there is little excuse for not reading the literature! Most everything you want to do has been done before and the details are written down.

    So open your eyes, swallow a bit of your ego and read!

Good luck and best wishes. If you have some interesting success, let us know and we’ll help you share that with others who visit these pages.

That’s an Internet tradition and the way we both grow.

Thanks for visiting.

3 comments on “Uses

  1. Question: I am testing the survival of Chinese Mantises in their eggcases during a prairie burn and need to know the temperature at the varying heights at which the eggcases will be elevated on a chain in the fire. I am not sure what temperatures to expect but a lot of fuel exists. I likely need a contact temperature sensor. Cost is a consideration as this will be totally out of my pocket. Any guidance much appreciated. Mark

  2. An interesting question! One that really deserves to be answered separately by each manufacturer, I think.

    However, a proper and traceable calibration certificate should go a long way towards insuring some sort of confidence that a specific device is “linear” as you have defined.

  3. I am looking for information showing that yes, ratio thermometers (two color instruments) are “linear” – meaning that they interpret radiation from 2 wavelengths of a black body source to produce a temperature reading that agrees with what Plank’s Law would produce, if one were to make the calculations ‘manually.’ Specifically, I am involved with an Ircon Modline 5, but the question probably goes to every IR thermometer.

    Yes, manufacturers assure us that their instruments are linear. On what basis do they say that?

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