Radiation thermometry: The measurement problem

Classic article by G. D. (Gene) Nutter from a NASA ARCHIVE et.al.

ASTM STP895 Cover
ASTM STP895 Cover (Image credit ASTM International)

This online article is very similar and covers most of the same materials as  “Radiation Thermometry — The Measurement Problem” delivered at a symposium sponsored by ASTM Committee E-20 on Temperature Measurement in cooperation with the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, MD on May 8, 1984.

This was subsequently published as the first chapter in the volume “Applications of Radiation Thermometry”, ASTM SPECIAL TECHNICAL PUBLICATION 895, J.C. Richmond, National Bureau of Standards and D.P. DeWitt, editors.

 

Radiation Thermometry—The Measurement Problem
Symposium Paper

January 1985 — STP895  STP38703S
The basic measurement problems of radiation thermometry are discussed, with emphasis on the physical processes giving rise to the emissivity effects observed in real materials. Emissivity is shown to derive from bulk absorptivity properties of the material. Blackbody radiation is produced within an opaque isothermal material, with partial internal reflection occurring at the surface.

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Gene Nutter wrote this and many other  technical articles on the subject of radiation thermometry, including another classic , “A High Precision Automatic Optical Pyrometer in Temperatures ITS measurement and Control in Science and Industry, Vol. 4, 519-530, Instrument Society of America (1972).

Description: “An overview of the theory and techniques of radiometric thermometry is presented. The characteristics of thermal radiators (targets) are discussed along with surface roughness and oxidation effects, fresnel reflection and subsurface effects in dielectrics.

“The effects of the optical medium between the radiating target and the radiation thermometer are characterized including atmospheric effects, ambient temperature and dust environment effects and the influence of measurement windows.

“The optical and photodetection components of radiation thermometers are described and techniques for the correction of emissivity effects are addressed.”

NASA Info:Link to article: https://archive.org/details/NASA_NTRS_Archive_19880014512

Publication date 1988-03-01
Topics NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS), INFRARED RADIOMETERS, RADIATION PYROMETERS, TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT, THERMOMETERS, BLACK BODY RADIATION, RADIANCE, SPACE COMMERCIALIZATION, SURFACE ROUGHNESS, THERMAL EMISSION, Nutter, G. D.,
Collection NASA_NTRS_Archive; additional_collections
Language English
Identifier NASA_NTRS_Archive_19880014512
Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t9h46mr2v
Ocr ABBYY FineReader 11.0
Pages 61

Ed Note (from the book jacket of the 1988 book “Theory and Practice of Radiation Thermometry”,  Edited by D.P. Dewitt and Gene D. Nutter, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.): “Gene D. Nutter is (was)  a senior staff member of the Instrumentation Center, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his MS in Physics from  University of Nebraska and had been earlier associated with the National Bureau of Standards and Atomics International.”

Chapter 5 in the above referenced text is linked below below. a classic book on the theory & practices of radiation thermometry published in 1998. It was recently found on Amazon.com and ebay.com at the following links:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0471610186/ref=rdr_ext_tmb FOR ABOUT $349.

AND for between $353 and $453 on ebay at:  https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2380057.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.Xtheory+%26+practice+of+radiation+thermometry.TRS0&_nkw=theory+%26+practice+of+radiation+thermometry&_sacat=0

 

Pyrometry or Radiation Thermometry (Continued) – Lecture 18

The Tenth Lecture in the 11 Lecture Sub-Series on Temperature Measurement.

Also online at youtu.be/a9tawff4LuI and NPTEL at: nptel.iitm.ac.in/video.php?subjectId=112106138.

Lecturers for these videos are Prof. Shunmugam M. S., Department of Mechanical Engineering , IIT Madras.(email: shun@iitm.ac.in) and.Prof. S.P. Venkateshan, Department of Mechanical Engineering , IIT Madras (email: spv@iitm.ac.in).

Numbers after the lecture title indicate the length of the lecture in (hh:mm:ss) format. You can appreciate from the list and times shown, this is about a 50 hour course, equivalent to a substantial opportunity to learn the topics in significant depth.

Lectures in this course: 50

– Syllabus: PDF.