Understanding Radiation Thermometry Parts I & II

From NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From NASA Article
From NASA Article

In 2015, Timothy K. Risch of NASA developed two technical articles that are available on the NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS).

Both articles may be freely downloaded from NTRS in various formats, as long as the NASA Server maintains their presence.

As far as we know these are royalty free and the only stipulation that NASA usually requires is an attribution. These are below in the form of links to the article on the NASA web site.

The articles are entitled:

Understanding Radiation Thermometry. Part I, 71 pages, publication date 2015-07-08, and Understanding Radiation Thermometry. Part II, 111 pages, same publication date.

We have reviewed these documents and find them to be an excellent summary of this temperature measurement method and have archived them on our site in two formats, mobi, suitable for reading on an E-reader and in Adobe pdf format.

Part 1 provides and Overview, Nomenclature, a bit about what temperature is and the history of measurement methods and delves into the physics underlying Radiation Thermometry.

Part II covers practical radiation thermometers, some detail on measurement techniques and calibration and a brief reference list.

These files are linked below many be freely downloaded as long as we maintain this website.

The NASA description for both article reads as follows:

This document is a two-part course on the theory and practice of radiation thermometry.

Radiation thermometry is the technique for determining the temperature of a surface or a volume by measuring the electromagnetic radiation it emits.

This course covers the theory and practice of radiative thermometry and emphasizes the modern application of the field using commercially available electronic detectors and optical components.

The course covers the historical development of the field, the fundamental physics of radiative surfaces, along with modern measurement methods and equipment.
NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) 20150021314 Understanding Radiation Thermometry. Part I NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) Free Download & Streaming Internet Archive

Understanding Radiation Thermometry – Part I pdf Format Timothy K. Risch NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center July 8, 2015

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) 20150021315 Understanding Radiation Thermometry. Part II NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) Free Download & Streaming Internet Archive

Understanding Radiation Thermometry – Part II pdf Format Timothy K. Risch NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center July 8, 2015

Sources on the NASA Technical Reports Server:

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20150021314.pdf

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20150021315.pdf

The Use of Johnson’s Criteria for Thermal Infrared Camera & Systems Performance

Written by: Opgal staff writers  (August 03, 2017)

OPGAL Blog LinkOnline —  When customers are considering which thermal security camera or system to buy, one of the first questions asked of thermal imager manufacturers is usually: “At what distance can the IR camera detect a target?.

In other words, what is the camera’s ability to capture very small details at great distances?

When thinking about effective surveillance, it is indeed a good criterion to differentiate one sensor from another.

No matter which manufacturer you are buying from, the answer given to this question will almost always include the DRI ranges expression.

DRI refers to the distance at which a target can be Detected, Recognized, or Identified, based on certain universally accepted parameters.

In order to select the right sensor for your defense, security, or surveillance needs, these DRI ranges have to be, first, perfectly defined, but also assessed with regards to globally adopted industrial standards.

Enter: The Origin of Johnson’s Criteria

In 1958, at the first ever “Night Vision Image Intensifier Symposium”, John Johnson, a night vision scientist at the U.S. Army’s “Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate” (NVESD), presented a paper named the Analysis of Image Forming Systems”.

Johnson’s paper defined a clear system with criteria and methodology for predicting an observer’s ability to find and assess targets using image intensifying equipment (such as thermal cameras), under various conditions. It worked well, and it was the first of its kind.

Johnson’s Criteria Definitions

Johnson’s model provided definitive criteria for calculating the maximum range at which “Detection, Recognition, and Identification (D, R, I)” could take place, with a 50% probability of success. (Orientation was also discussed, but this parameter is not used or recognized today).

Although newer methodologies for D,R,I exist today, such as NVESD’s “Night Vision Image Performance Model” (NV-IPM), the “Johnson’s Criteria” system was groundbreaking for its time, was the accepted standard in the defense industry for many years, and is still widely used in the security industry today.

Detection

Johnson defined “Detection” as the ability to subtend 1 TV line pair (+/- 0.25 line pairs) across the critical dimension of the subject (this translates to 2 pixels when using an LCD monitor). At the range that this occurs, regardless of target type, the observer could detect that a subject was in the field of view, 50% of the time. Today, many security camera companies loosely follow Johnson’s Criteria and define their camera’s “Detection” performance range as the ability to subtend either 1.5 or 2 pixels on the target, using various target sizes.

Recognition

Johnson defined “Recognition” as the ability to subtend 4 TV line pairs (+/- 0.8 line pairs) across the critical dimension of the subject (this translates to 8 +/- 1 pixels when using an LCD monitor). At the range that this occurs, regardless of target type, the observer determines the type of subject, a human or a car for example, 50% of the time. Today many security camera companies typically define their cameras “Recognition” performance range as the ability to subtend 6 pixels on the target, using various target sizes.

Identification

Johnson defined “Identification” as the ability to subtend 6.4 TV line pairs (+/- 1.5 line pairs) across the critical dimension of the subject (this translates to 12 +/- 3 pixels when using an LCD monitor). At the range that this occurs, regardless of target type, the observer could detect the subject.

Today many security camera companies loosely follow Johnson’s Criteria and define their cameras “Identification” performance range as the ability to subtend 12 pixels on the target, using various target sizes.

Long range performance

Johnson’s Criteria in the Security Industry

DRI ranges, expressed in kilometers (or miles), can usually be found in the specification table of infrared camera brochures, or in a description of the cameras features. While a very helpful jumping off point for narrowing down the options and homing in on the best systems, customers would be doing themselves a disservice to only look at DRI.

This is because today the application of Johnson’s criteria varies somewhat across the security industry. In most instances, documentation uses simplified or modified versions of the criteria, but they do all generally follow similar rules.

Typically, most companies use twelve pixels on the target for identification, six for recognition, and two for detection (sometimes 1.5). However, the target size can vary greatly. Normally the defense industry “NATO” target size (2.3×2.3 meters) is used for calculating the performance range for detecting vehicles, but for a human target, various target sizes can be found.

It is important when selecting your thermal infrared camera to keep in mind that in any given document, the target size for a human can range from 1.7-1.83 meters tall and from 0.3- 0.75 meters wide, and factor this into your decision-making process.

The Need to look at the Bigger Picture

Because end-users often place a high value on the written specifications of the camera, marketing departments are under pressure to use performance calculations that make their cameras look better than the competitors. However, since these calculations typically do not take environmental factors into account, customers should ask their thermal camera providers to explain the other elements and benefits of each camera they are offering, and how they will perform in a variety of conditions.

A modified approach that considers parameters such as these can better help in choosing the right or system for your needs.

The post appeared first on OPGAL.com.

Thermocouple App Notes Series, 1 of 4 – Thermocouple Fundamentals

App notes on how TCs work & their calibration

Thermocouple App notesOnline — Thermocouples are broadly used in many industrial and scientific applications. But it can be a bit tricky to understand how they work and how to calibrate them.

Fluke Calibration has developed a thermocouple application note series created by temperature calibration experts to help you learn what you need to know.

The series covers how thermocouples work, choosing calibration equipment, calculating uncertainties, and how to calibrate thermocouples.

There are four application notes in the series:

Visit the webpage at Fluke calibration where you may download the app notes directly: http://us.flukecal.com/blog/thermocouple-calibration-what-you-need-know

Calibration and Metrology training Webinars

Calibration and Metrology training Webinars by Fluke CalibrationCalibration and metrology training webinars are free and offer real-world expertise and practical tips about electrical, flow, pressure, RF and temperature calibration and metrology.

New webinars are added monthly.

If you would like to be the first to know about new seminars, sign up for Fluke Calibration’s metrology and calibration training webinar alerts.

If you can’t find the topic you seek, they may have already covered it.

View their list of 90+ on-demand calibration and metrology training webinars to find out.

A calibration bath primer

Courtesy of FLUKE Corporation

FLUKE Calibration Bath

I’m a big fan of calibration baths.

When I managed our temperature calibration laboratory, I relied on them.

With a series of baths and a liquid nitrogen comparator, we were able to perform a large volume of accredited temperature calibrations with lower uncertainties from -197 °C to 500 °C than would have been possible in any other way.

By Ron Ainsworth from FLUKE Calibration.

Read the Fluke Calibraion Bath Primer online

Ron Ainsworth is the Business Manager for Process Calibration Tools at Fluke Calibration. After graduating with a degree in physics in 1998, he started in the primary temperature calibration laboratory in American Fork Utah.

Mercury Thermometer Alternatives by NIST

Promoting alternatives

no mercuryOnline —  The USA’s National Institute for Science & Technology (NIST) is not only  the nation’s National Metrology Institute (NMI), it also serves additional roles, including cooperating with other government agencies to safeguard people from harm due to sensors or practices that could be hazardous.

About 20 years ago the use of mercury-filled sensors, such as barometers, hygrometers and liquid-in-glass thermometers were recognized as sources of long-term hazards to man and nearly all animals.

The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began efforts to ban the use of mercury in such devices and NIST has been in the forefront of the effort, along with volunteer organizations like ASTM International.

NIST has published a series of webpages that describe the issues related to mercury filled thermometers and considered several alternatives, some of which, in this Editor’s opinion are long overdue.

The rest of this article is copied from the December 22, 2016 NIST webpage: https://www.nist.gov/pml/sensor-science/thermodynamic-metrology/mercury-thermometer-alternatives-promoting-alternatives that begins the NIST series of information pages to help users understand some of the alternatives to mercury-filled  Liquid-in-Glass thermometers.

In effect these new temperature sensor alternatives bring many testing and measuring practices into the modern world of both sensor and display technologies, providing durability, precision and traceability along with digital options, in many cases.

Mercury-filled thermometers have historically served numerous industries as reliable temperature standards. Increased regulation and the high cost of cleaning up mercury spills have encouraged the use of alternative types of thermometers.

To support the use of alternative thermometers, the NIST Temperature and Humidity Group provides guidance documents, training, and technical consultation to other government agencies and standards-developing organizations.

Replacement of mercury thermometers with suitable alternatives will reduce releases of mercury into the environment and will reduce costs incurred to clean up mercury spills.

Historically, healthcare and regulated testing laboratories have relied greatly on NIST-calibrated mercury-in-glass thermometers as stable reference standards of temperature.

The use of mercury thermometers has been virtually eliminated in routine hospital use, but a wide variety of regulations and test methods continue to specify mercury thermometers.

Mercury thermometers have several intrinsic advantages:

  • they are stable for long periods,
  • failure is usually visually apparent, and
  • they require little training or maintenance.

 

However, mercury is a powerful neurotoxin, and the cost of cleaning a mercury spill in industry is many thousands of dollars. Furthermore, many states restrict the sale of mercury thermometers.

In 2008, the NIST Temperature and Humidity Group worked with several organizations to reduce or eliminate the use of mercury thermometers.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):  the EPA hosted meetings in the Spring of 2008 to discuss strategies to eliminate the use of mercury thermometers in EPA regulations and laboratories. NIST provided technical guidance documents, presentations, and technical advice as experts in temperature measurements.

Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute (CLSI):  NIST Temperature and Humidity Group staff have worked with CLSI staff to update standards calling for the use of mercury-in-glass SRM thermometers, enabling laboratories to use other thermometer types with NIST traceability.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):  Control of temperature is critical to proper storage of vaccines, in order to preserve safety and efficacy. At CDC’s invitation, the NIST Temperature and Humidity Group gave a presentation at the May, 2008 “Vaccine University” that CDC sponsors. Over 60 participants learned how traceable temperature measurement and control can be achieved with modern electronic thermometers.

These activities build on support provided in 2007 to the Food and Drug Administration (steam processing of food) and ASTM committee D2 on petroleum.

In an environment of increased regulatory and economic pressures to discontinue the use of mercury thermometers, NIST has provided timely and critically important technical advice to other federal agencies and thermometer users, ensuring that important industrial and health-care temperature measurements are performed efficiently and accurately.

Major accomplishments:

  • Guidance document published on how to identify alternatives to mercury liquid-in-glass thermometers.
  • Technical support provided to other government agencies and to developers of documentary standards.

 

Links to other NIST webpages:

 

Selected Publications & Related Links

 

Questions about Mercury Thermometer Alternatives?

“Temperature units and temperature unit conversion”

A Useful Blog Post From Beamex.com

small temp scale image from Beamex
Beamex Image: click to view larger version. Reproduced with permission

Online — Beamex have also developed a Temperature Unit Converter and have placed it on their web site,

Click the link below to visit it:

The page covers most of the same topics that we do here, but with a slightly different perspective, especially the topic of the the Reamur temperature scale.

The topics covered are:

  • What is temperature?
  • International temperature scales
  • Temperature Units
  • Conversions between temperature units
  • TEMPERATURE UNIT CONVERTER
  • Beamex temperature calibration products

Beamex’s business is calibration.

Since technology continues to rapidly progress, companies need to be more efficient with less resources. At the same time, new regulations put constant pressure on manufacturing operations to maintain a high level of plant safety and product quality. With these in mind, we are here to help our customers to find a better way.

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National Physical Laboratory Video Presentations on Temperature Measurements

 

New references for high temperature measurements

As a culmination of an eight-year research programme an international collaboration has developed robust reference fixed points, studied their sensitivity to impurities and external conditions and finally measured their melting transition temperature.

This talk describes how 100+ measurements made by nine different NMIs have been combined to assign low-uncertainty thermodynamic temperatures to the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C metal-carbon eutectics.

At the simplest level, these fixed-points will provide new temperature references for the calibration of pyrometers at temperatures above the freezing point of silver (1234.93 K) and will thus reduce the uncertainties associated with high temperature measurement compared to those achievable using the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90).

The thermodynamic temperatures of these fixed-points have been determined through direct measurement of the radiance of a blackbody cavity surrounded by the fixed-point material from Planck’s law and hence the Boltzmann Constant. The evolving mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin encourages the realisation and dissemination of thermodynamic temperature.

This may be directly – and the work described in this talk shows that filter radiometry is sufficiently mature for this, or it may be by providing fixed-points with reference thermodynamic temperatures that have associated uncertainties – and this talk will outline such temperatures.
Innovations in High Temperature Measurement

A 49 minute review of the present technical status of High Temperature measurement by one of the leaders in temperature Metrology at NPL in the UK.

Presented by Dr. Graham Machin, NPL (Recorded July 2011)

Recent and unfolding innovations in this area promise step change improvements throughout the measurement chain; from realisation of temperature above 1300 K in National Measurement Institutes, dissemination of the scale to calibration laboratories, down to the practice of industrial high temperature thermometry.

Source: http://www.npl.co.uk/science-lectures/high-temperature-measurement

More details: Read more National Physical Laboratory Video Presentations on Temperature Measurements

The most accurate temperature measurements ever made. Probably.

NPL Lecture by Michael de Podesta

It is now 25 years since the establishment of the International Temperature Scale of 1990. The scale has been extremely successful in enabling accurate and consistent temperature measurement around the world.

However, it has become clear that the thermodynamic temperature estimates on which ITS-90 is based were in error, even at temperatures close to the triple point of water.

The discovery and elucidation of this error is largely due to the development of acoustic thermometry.

Over the last decade, the development of combined microwave and acoustic resonators for the measurement of the Boltzmann constant has improved the state-of-the-art significantly and resulted in advances in theory, fabrication, and experimental techniques.

After reviewing some of these advances, we present new data on T – T90 at twenty temperatures in the range from 118 K to 303 K.

The differences agree well with other recent estimates, but our low uncertainty reveals previously unseen detail. These measurements probably constitute the most accurate measurements of temperature ever achieved.

Source: http://www.npl.co.uk/science-lectures/the-most-accurate-temperature-measurements-ever-made-probably

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Irr8fOLtiWc

Recorded: 16 June 2015

Speaker: Michael de Podesta

New references for high temperature measurements

Summary of work reported for high temperature measurements from NPL

As a culmination of an eight-year research programme an international collaboration has developed robust reference fixed points, studied their sensitivity to impurities and external conditions and finally measured their melting transition temperature.

This talk describes how 100+ measurements made by nine different NMIs have been combined to assign low-uncertainty thermodynamic temperatures to the melting transition of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C metal-carbon eutectics.

At the simplest level, these fixed-points will provide new temperature references for the calibration of pyrometers at temperatures above the freezing point of silver (1234.93 K) and will thus reduce the uncertainties associated with high temperature measurement compared to those achievable using the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90).

The thermodynamic temperatures of these fixed-points have been determined through direct measurement of the radiance of a blackbody cavity surrounded by the fixed-point material from Planck’s law and hence the Boltzmann Constant.

The evolving mise en pratique for the definition of the kelvin encourages the realisation and dissemination of thermodynamic temperature.

This may be directly – and the work described in this talk shows that filter radiometry is sufficiently mature for this, or it may be by providing fixed-points with reference thermodynamic temperatures that have associated uncertainties – and this talk outlines such temperatures.

Recorded: 16 June 2015

Speaker: Emma Woolliams

Last Updated: 10 Sep 2015

Source: http://www.npl.co.uk/science-lectures/new-references-for-high-temperature-measurements

YouTube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4Ws6PiqQ9cs.YouTube video:

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